Reviews

The Special Power of Restoring Lost Things

"Mauk writes in a smooth and stirring prose which brings the horror of grief and resentment acutely near...A sensitive portrayal—psychologically powerful but never overplayed, deftly conveying the human truth that not everything turns out OK."-- Kirkus Reviews

"As each character pursues emotional stability down various avenues, the narrative tension renders Mauk’s novel a page turner with depth, power, and keen emotional insight." - John Baum, Necessary Fiction

LitHub's 18 Books You Should Read This October

Orion's Daughters

“Mauk’s second venture is a nuanced character study that draws the reader into its compelling, unique world.” – Kristine Huntley, Booklist

“Judging by this new novel, [Mauk] has kindled the start of a solid career in storytelling…Orion’s Daughters is told in a series of brief chapters, some only a page long, which have the short, sweet crunch of beads on a candy necklace.” – David Abrams, The Quivering Pen

“With each sentence and chapter perfectly paced and phrased, [Orion's Daughters] struck me as the rare second novel that gains a level of polish and sophistication without giving up the raw power of the first book.” – Jennifer Messner, Books, Personally

“Courtney Elizabeth Mauk’s second novel…is a haunting and lyrically told book about friendship and the shadows the past hold over the present.” – David Gutkowsky, Largehearted Boy

Spark

“An absorbing and nuanced character study.” – Kristine Huntley, Booklist

“[Mauk] writes skillfully about the sibling bond between Andrea and Delphie, setting their new life in a layered New York landscape…Subway riders, trendy Brooklynites, urban children — all come to life with precision through the lens of Andrea’s lonely eyes.” – Elizabeth Word Gutting, Washington Post Book World

“A riveting read that will keep the pages turning, highly recommended.” – Midwest Book Review

“[Spark] is as mesmerizing as the flame of the match that in one terrifying and terrible moment took the lives of an innocent family and forever transformed young Andrea and her older brother Delphie.” – Jennifer Messner, LitStack

“I feel like this is the book Phoebe Caulfield might have written twenty years later, if and when (it’s a when, isn’t it?) she had to take Holden in.” – Insatiable Booksluts

“This is a book as much about its central fictional story as it is about how people create their stories, how they must invent an understanding of other people’s actions and where everyone’s lives affect one another and fit together.” – Michelle Bailat-Jones, Necessary Fiction

“[Mauk's] prose style is delicate yet also luscious.” – Maura Lynch, Loudmouthkid62